Seminars

Not all classes are available every term.  Please look at individual listings or course schedule to see what is offered.

Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past (G)

Provides perspective for thinking about the future through the study of historical physical science and historically significant experiments. Designed to build awareness of the unexpected through both observation of the sky and lab activities that focus on light, electricity, and motion. Labs are complemented by museum and site visits; readings include accounts by Galileo, Archimedes, and other historical observers. Individual and team assignments provide opportunities to develop skills in observation, exploration, and evaluation.

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Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past (U)

Provides perspective for thinking about the future through the study of historical physical science and historically significant experiments. Designed to build awareness of the unexpected through both observation of the sky and lab activities that focus on light, electricity, and motion. Labs are complemented by museum and site visits; readings include accounts by Galileo, Archimedes, and other historical observers. Individual and team assignments provide opportunities to develop skills in observation, exploration, and evaluation.

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Special Subject at the Edgerton Center

Seminar combining lectures and lab run by students and academic staff at the Edgerton Center. Students explore specialized electronics, robotics, or mechanical design and fabrication topics not offered in the regular curriculum; classes range from beginner level to more advanced. Some offerings may be taught in an intensive fashion (meeting for up to several times a week for four weeks). Up to three sequential seminars may be offered per semester, covering a different topic each time. Students can take one or all of the seminars.

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Starting Up New Technology-Based Business Enterprises at MIT

Seminar participants define and study the development stages of new enterprises at MIT, from the exciting moment a new idea for a tech product or service is realized, through to selling, customer support, and the next new idea. Follows the history of successful MIT spin-off companies with attention to the people (and their ideas) behind the start-up. Students attend MIT technology and science start-up case presentations given by individuals and teams working from zero-stage, and by partners in going concerns of historical relevance to the Institute and the economy.

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The Start-up Experience at MIT

Explores some of the critical actions in starting up a technology-based business, including concept generation, searching prior art and patents, protecting intellectual property, founders agreements, forming and building teams, and work-life balance. Students review case studies and complete exercises that develop practicable knowledge in these areas. Each student keeps an "idea log book," which includes critical assessments of each case study, to be presented at the end of the term.

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