Harold Edgerton at MIT

Strobe Project Laboratory (6.163) open seats! Register now

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Semester
Level
Topic / type
Showing 1 - 20 of 39
Subject Number Sort descending Title Level Faculty Time Semester
6.070/ EC.120

Electronics Project Lab

Intuition-based introduction to electronics, electronic components and test equipment such as oscilloscopes, meters (voltage, resistance inductance, capacitance, etc.), and signal generators. Emphasizes individual instruction and development of skills, such as soldering, assembly, and troubleshooting. Students design, build, and keep a small electronics project to put their new knowledge into practice. Intended for students with little or no previous background in electronics.

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UG J. Bales M 7-10p Fall, Spring
6.163

Strobe Project Laboratory

Here, you’ll learn the application of electronic flash sources to measurement and photography. The first half of the course covers the fundamentals of photography and electronic flashes, including experiments on the application of electronic flash to photography, stroboscopy, motion analysis, and high-speed videography. Students write five extensive lab reports.

In the second half, students work in small groups to select, design, and execute independent projects in measurement or photography that apply the learned techniques. Project planning and execution skills are discussed and developed over the term. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises.

Enrollment limited. 12 Engineering Design Points.

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UG J. Bales MW 12-1p, labs TBD Fall, Spring
EC.050

Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past

Look at the world with open eyes. Wonder. Question. Explore. Reflect.

Watch for the night sky, again and again, with your own eyes.  Catch a shadow; where is it next?  Spot something, move, view again.  Share observing activities with classmates, people in history and indigenous practices.  Construct geometry together.  Discover geometrical and human relations through diverse perspectives. Explore hands-on with instruments and methods from historical times. Listen to voices of others, now and in the past.   Examine injustice; question what produces and perpetuates it.  Build community that is relational, accepting, and antiracist.  Encourage each other’s curiosity, vulnerability and growth. 

Readings, journal, observations, collaborations, and a final reflective paper. Past projects include: following shadows; watching the sky; art projects with historical methods; making educational videos; collaborative experiments; conference presentations; enacting historical and feminist drama; MIT History… Whatever your interests, this is a place to explore them.

Your own story uncovers insights for educational research.

What will you notice and question, explore and express?

Contact: Elizabeth Cavicchi ecavicch@mit.edu

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UG E. Cavicchi Fall, IAP, Spring
EC.075

Starting Up New Tech-Based Business

Seminar participants define and study the development stages of new enterprises at MIT, from the exciting moment a new idea for a tech product or service is realized, through to selling, customer support, and the next new idea. Follows the history of successful MIT spin-off companies with attention to the people (and their ideas) behind the start-up. Students attend MIT technology and science start-up case presentations given by individuals and teams working from zero-stage, and by partners in going concerns of historical relevance to the Institute and the economy. Second in a two-part series (seminars do not have to be taken sequentially; see EC.074 in fall term).

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UG Hadzima, J., Shyduroff, R. T7-9p Spring
EC.090

Recreate Experiments from History: Inform the Future from the Past

Look at the world with open eyes. Wonder. Question. Explore. Reflect.

Watch for the night sky, again and again, with your own eyes.  Catch a shadow; where is it next?  Spot something, move, view again.  Share observing activities with classmates, people in history and indigenous practices.  Construct geometry together.  Discover geometrical and human relations through diverse perspectives. Explore hands-on with instruments and methods from historical times. Listen to voices of others, now and in the past.   Examine injustice; question what produces and perpetuates it.  Build community that is relational, accepting, and antiracist.  Encourage each other’s curiosity, vulnerability and growth. 

Readings, journal, observations, collaborations, and a final reflective paper. Past projects include: following shadows; watching the sky; art projects with historical methods; making educational videos; collaborative experiments; conference presentations; enacting historical and feminist drama; MIT History… Whatever your interests, this is a place to explore them.

Your own story uncovers insights for educational research.

What will you notice and question, explore and express?

Contact: Elizabeth Cavicchi ecavicch@mit.edu

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G E. Cavicchi Fall, IAP, Spring
EC.305

Digital and Darkroom Imaging

Students use both film and digital photography to develop a creative imaging project of their own choice. Develops skills in the use of image editing software to enhance, select, and combine images that the student has taken. Uses the darkroom to develop film for scanning and for chemical enlargement. Discusses topics such as the camera, composition, lighting, modes and formats, image compression, and halftone and dye sublimation printing. Students are expected to produce a duplicate set of black and white and/or color prints, along with a writeup and digital copy as the project output. Credit cannot also be received for EC.310.

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UG T. Mislick R 3-5pm Fall
EC.310

Creative Imaging

Focuses on film and digital photography. Develops skill in the use of chemical darkrooms, scanners, digital printers and cameras to create striking still images capable of evoking strong emotional and intellectual responses from a viewer. Emphasizes the interplay between classical chemical and digital techniques and how they can be used to control the use of lighting, color, depth, and composition in an image. Students present their intermediate assignments to the class for critical discussion; at the end of the term, they submit a substantive project presenting their own creative images for critique and evaluation. Credit cannot also be received for EC.305.

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UG T. Mislick R 2-5pm
EC.701J/ 11.025J

D-Lab: Development

Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. In-person not required. (Meets with Grad level EC.781/11.472J)

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UG L. Hsu, B. Sanyal MWF3:30-5 Fall
EC.711/ EC.791/ 2.651

Introduction to Energy in Global Development

Provides an overview of thermodynamics and heat transfer through an international development context to impart energy literacy and common sense applications. Students survey various alternative energy technologies and strategies for implementation in developing countries. Focuses on compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating electrical power and meeting household-level needs. Labs reinforce lecture material through deconstruction, system assembly, and sensor installation to track performance. Team projects involve activities, such as researching community needs, assessing the suitability of specific technologies, continuing the development of ongoing projects, and assessing the efficacy and impacts of existing projects. Optional summer fieldwork may be available. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session.

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UG Verploegen, E. MW1-2:30p (LEC) F1-3p (LAB) Spring
EC.712J/ 2.652J

Applications of Energy in Global Development

A hands-on, project-focused class that engages students through community-based approaches to advance the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goal 7, which seeks to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy. Teams work on off-grid energy projects related to lighting, cooking, agricultural productivity, or other solutions with pre-selected community partners. Project work includes assessment of user needs, technology identification, product design, prototyping, and implementation strategies for ongoing projects. Optional January site visits may be available to test and implement the solutions developed during the semester. In-person not required. (Meets with EC.782)

Prerequisites: None, but students who have taken 2.651/EC.711/EC.791 D-Lab: Energy Fundamentals will be given preference. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

https://d-lab.mit.edu/courses/energy-applications

 

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UG E. Verploegen, Staff TR 3-5pm Fall
EC.715/ 11.474

D-Lab: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Focuses on disseminating Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) or water/environment innovations in developing countries and underserved communities worldwide. Structured around field-based learning, case studies, lectures and videos in which teams propose an idea and are mentored through the process of bringing that innovation to fruition. Emphasizes core WASH and water/environment principles, culture-specific solutions, tools for start-ups, appropriate and sustainable technologies, behavior change, social marketing, building partnerships, and the theory and practice of innovation diffusion. Term project entails entering the IDEAS or other competition(s) while implementing a WASH innovation in a specific locale. Guest lectures on specific real-world WASH projects which have been disseminated by MIT faculty, students, alumni, and others. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 30.

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UG Murcott, S., Hsu, S. T12-3p Spring
EC.717/ EC.787

D-Lab: Education & Learning

Provides an overview of pedagogical theories and core teaching skills that allow students to craft their own K-12 curriculum using the design process. Working in groups and collaborating with an international partner, students use the design process to create a final project for a specific audience that emphasizes hands-on, inclusive, project-based learning. Suitable for students with varying levels of teaching experience. Local fieldwork and K-12 classroom visits are required throughout the semester and international fieldwork may be available to students in the summer. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 10.

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UG Nam, L. R7-9p Spring
EC.718J/ WGS.277J

D-Lab: Gender & Development

Explores gender roles, illuminates the power dynamics and root causes of inequality, and provides a framework for understanding gender dynamics. Develops skills to conduct a gender analysis and integrate gender-sensitive strategies into large- and small-scale development solutions. Prompts critical discussion about social, economic, and political conditions that shape gender in development (particularly design and implementation of appropriate technology) as well as agricultural and job creation initiatives. In project development workshops students apply key tools to real-life situations, e.g., providing a gender analysis and making recommendations on how to incorporate gender considerations into an existing organization; developing programs in low-income communities; or building a gender component to be incorporated in a new initiative. Opportunities may be available for international fieldwork over IAP. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 12; must attend first class session. (Meets with EC.798)

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UG E. McDonald, S. Haslanger W9:30-12:30 Fall
EC.719/ EC.789

D-Lab: Water & Climate Change and Health

Addresses mitigation and adaptation to climate change as it pertains to water and health. Focuses on regions where water-borne illness, malnutrition, and vector-borne diseases - problems that will worsen with increasing temperatures and urban overcrowding - represent the top three causes of morbidity and mortality. Includes readings, workshops and films that address water, climate change and health challenges and explore solutions. Field trips include coastal watershed restoration, flood protection, carbon sequestration, and zero-carbon sites in the Boston area. Students complete a term project and/or teach a class, setting the stage for a life-long commitment to communicating climate science to a broad public. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

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UG Murcott, S., Simpson, J. R12-3p Spring
EC.720J/2.722

D-Lab: Design

Addresses problems faced by underserved communities with a focus on design, experimentation, and prototyping processes. Particular attention placed on constraints faced when designing for developing countries. Multidisciplinary teams work on long-term projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Topics covered include design for affordability, manufacture, sustainability, and strategies for working effectively with community partners and customers. Students may continue projects begun in EC.701. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session.

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UG Grama, S., Squibb, E. TR3:30-5p Spring
EC.729J/ 2.729J

D-Lab: Design for Scale

Focuses on product development of technologies for people in less industrialized markets. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to develop previously established prototypes or technologies towards manufacturing-ready product designs. Topics are presented within the context of the developing world and include technology feasibility and scalability assessment; value chain analysis; product specification; design for affordability, manufacturability, usability, and desirability; and product testing and manufacturing at various scales. Lessons are experiential and case study-based; taught by instructors with field experience and by industry experts from product development consulting firms and the consumer electronics industry. In-person not required. (Meets with EC.797)

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UG H. Quintus-Bosz, M. Yang, Staff TR 11:30-1, R1-2:30 Fall
EC.731J/ MAS.665J/ 15.375J

Global Ventures

Seminar on founding, financing, and building entrepreneurial ventures in developing nations. Challenges students to craft enduring and economically viable solutions to the problems faced by these countries. Cases illustrate examples of both successful and failed businesses, and the difficulties in deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. Explores a range of established and emerging business models, as well as new business opportunities enabled by innovations emerging from MIT labs and beyond. Students develop a business plan executive summary suitable for submission in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition's Accelerate Contest or MIT IDEAS.

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UG A. Pentland, J. Bonsen R10-12 Fall
EC.744

Technologies for Mental Health and Wellness

Provides an introduction to the field of computational psychiatry from the perspective of technology platforms that can be applied to mental health and wellness. Identifies current needs and challenges informed by clinical practice, and reviews emerging technologies, including chatbots, social robots, wearable sensors, virtual reality, mobile phones, and digital phenotyping. Discusses related topics of privacy and ethical use. Students complete weekly written assignments as well as three design exercises over the course of the semester. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. (Meets with EC.794)

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UG R. Fletcher, K. Hodges R11-1 Fall
EC.746J/ 2.00C/ 1.016J

Design for Complex Environmental Issues

Students work in small groups, under the guidance of researchers from MIT, to pursue specific aspects of the year's Terrascope problem. Teams design and build prototypes, graphic displays and other tools to communicate their findings and display them in a Bazaar of Ideas open to the MIT community. Some teams develop particular solutions, others work to provide deeper understanding of the issues, and others focus on ways to communicate these ideas with the general public. Students' work is evaluated by independent experts. Offers students an opportunity to develop ideas from the fall semester and to work in labs across MIT. Limited to first-year students.

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UG Epstein, A,, Hsu, S., Grimm, J. MW3-4:30p, F3p Spring
EC.750/ EC.785

Humanitarian Innovation: Design for Relief, Rebuilding and Recovery

Explores the role innovation can and does play in how humanitarian aid is provided, and how it can impact people, products, and processes. Provides a fundamental background in the history and practice of humanitarian aid. Considers the various ways that design can be used to enhance aid, such as product and system design for affected populations, co-creation with affected populations, and capacity building to promote design by refugees and the displaced. Case studies and projects examine protracted displacement as well as recovery and resettlement, including efforts in Colombia, Lebanon, Nepal, Sudan, and Uganda. Potential for students to travel over the summer to partner communities.

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UG Smith, A., Thompson, M. MW1-3p Spring